Street Art Sisterhood

“…I like to think the streets need me. So many people walk by with their heads down looking at their phones that they don’t notice their surroundings and…when they do see something I’ve left behind, whether a sticker or tag, it makes them take notice..”

– Street artists L.

As an artist and designer, I’m often told that my art is too “girly”. These comments are discernibly frustrating and often make me want to ask, “Would you like me to beef up my art and draw a lumberjack instead?”. Of course, that’s not the case, the issue often comes down to who made the art, not what is actually represented in the art.

In this podcast by Stuff Your Mother Never Told You, the hosts dive into the topic of street art. I was a bit nervous to listen to it at first because I assumed it would be filled with misconceptions. I was admittedly (and thankfully) wrong. The podcast points out that street artists who are women are more often than not labelled as “female street artists”. Their work is directly compared to men and scrutinized for its use of color and imagery. The podcast talks about one incident in which a street artist is told she is brave for using purple, pink, and glitter in her art, as if these “feminine” attributes are undesirable.

I am struck by how the perception of the female figure is skewed depending on whether or not the viewer knows the artist is male vs. female. Don’t believe me? Let me test your knowledge a bit. Below are a series of photos taken of street artists’ work and you have to guess which artists you think are female vs male:

vexta_22-street-art

elle-street-art

SF-Soma-Heuman-DSC08871

madc-european-street-art

mags-sf-street-art

aiko-street-art

missvan-propastuff2013

 

Do you think you know the answer? Well, the truth is they’re all street artists and yes, they’re all women. These women are working to craft their own narratives through art and they don’t give a sh*t about labels. If you’re interested in learning more about any of their work, I encourage you to look at the following resources:

Feminist Street Art Documentary“The Country Where 15 Women Are Killed Each Day, Simply For Being Women”

Few and Far Women

Street Art and Social Change – 1AM SF Gallery

Elle Street Art

Miss Van

MadC

Nuria Mora

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The No Tech Zone

We’re all guilty of it. Our heads are in the clouds of our iPhones and we miss the world thriving around us. This past October, San Francisco-based artist, Ivan Cash, took it upon himself to lure people away from their phone screens and into the present moment. There’s something about street art that forces peoples’ eyes to stop disregarding their surroundings. It’s a gravitational pull that street artists know will attract passersby and the artistry of subtle, clever placement helps get their message across clearly. In this case, it took a bit of prodding to get people to look up from their tech devices, but Cash did just that with his No Tech Zone installations. Inspired by the need to get people to appreciate the beauty of SF, Cash and his crew took to the grass of several public parks to install “No Tech Zone” signs, which stated: “No Tech-Zone; No cellphones, tablets, laptops, or smart devices permitted; Violators subject to $300 fine.”

It’s no secret that San Francisco is struggling with a number of major issues like the SF tech-boom, gentrification, and housing crisis. Although Cash’s art may seem to question the intersection of these challenges, he explained that he wanted to focus this project on the role technology plays in our lives and our environments. As technology continues to expand and people become more interconnect with the Internet of Things, will we lose sight of our surroundings for the glare of our phone screens? We might not have answers readily available, but these are conversations we should be having and art continues to remind us to wake up to these realities.

No-Tech-Zone-Sign-Night-Installation-Ivan-Cash No-Tech-Zone-Sign-Park-Ivan-Cash No-Tech-Zone-Sign-Park-Ivan-Cash-Sunset

To learn more about the No Tech Zone project visit the official website here.

Collection of 2015’s Funniest Animated GIFs

Check out some of the funniest gifs of 2015 and share others you’ve found by tweeting @LongLegsAndHair.

Zuck baby Dawg making it rain by R A D I O

Zuck baby Dawg making it rain by R A D I O

 

Final Video! by Valentin Kirilov

Final Video! by Valentin Kirilov

A rabbit flying in a carrot by Jonathan Dahl

A rabbit flying in a carrot by Jonathan Dahl

Hairstyles 01 by Jonathan Dahl

Hairstyles 01 by Jonathan Dahl

Jerry Car Day by Misha Petrick

Jerry Car Day by Misha Petrick

Batman Run by Jonathan Dahl

Batman Run by Jonathan Dahl

Skepticat - the raptor whisperer by Tony Babel

Skepticat – the raptor whisperer by Tony Babel

Trick by James Curran

Trick by James Curran

Caveman by Markus Magnusson

Caveman by Markus Magnusson

Travel Selfie by Seth Eckert

Travel Selfie by Seth Eckert

Pokébiome 001: Bulbasaur by John Schlemmer

Pokébiome 001: Bulbasaur by John Schlemmer

BFFLs "Pizza & Beer" 🍕🍺💕 by Ben Voldman

BFFLs “Pizza & Beer” 🍕🍺💕 by Ben Voldman

Meet the Arist Designing 3D Shells for Homeless Hermit Crabs

Little critters have to show off their fashion too sometimes. However, they can’t show off their style if humans keep coming along and stealing their clothes. Hermit crabs in Taiwan are having their homes threatened by the over collection of seashells by humans. Fortunately, these nomadic sea-dwellers have a sympathetic defender on their side.

Meet Aki Inomata, a Tokyo native who received her MFA in Media Arts and whose breadth of work has landed her a handful of creative art awards. Inomata heard the bubbling cry of homeless hermit crabs and delved into a new project she dubbed, “Why not hand over a shelter to hermit crabs?

Hermit Crab - NYC - New York City - Inomata
Thanks to 3-D modeling technology, Inomata was able to scan shells and create dreamlike cityscapes to display on top of them. Some of the structures are heavily influenced by Japanese architecture, but others also are inspired by the bâtiments of Paris, Dutch windmills, and Manhattan skyscrapers. The structures are uniquely crafted to be adopted by hermit crabs, but they are mainly aesthetic statements.

Hermit Crab - Dutch Windmills - Inomata - 3D Model

Slide-Honfuer-Hermit Crab Village - Inomata Desgin

Despite Inomata’s efforts, her hermit crabs’ partiality to her shells was short lived, as many of the crabs abandoned the plastic cities after a few days. This creative endeavor to solve these hermit crabs homeless crisis must be applauded not only for its artistic approach, but also its message. Through this project Inomata explained, “I connected my study of the hermit’s transformation to the self-adaptation of humans, whether it be in acquiring a new nationality, immigrating, or relocating.” In this way, we can all learn a thing or two from these hermit crabs about adopting new forms of ourselves.

Weekly Inspiration #2

Cheers to incredible designers and artists everywhere! This post is a part of a weekly series to honor these artists and inspire other designers by sharing their work. If you’d like to share your graphic design inspiration, you can submit your images and inspiration via Twitter @longlegsandhair.

 

by Asuka Watanabe

by Asuka Watanabe

 

Kawaii Barcode by Design Barcode

Kawaii Barcode by Design Barcode

 

16 Festival de Teatro de La Habana by Rafael Alejandro Garcia

16 Festival de Teatro de La Habana by Rafael Alejandro Garcia

 

16 Festival de Teatro de La Habana by Rafael Alejandro Garcia

16 Festival de Teatro de La Habana by Rafael Alejandro Garcia

 

Big City Brewing Co. by MUTI

Big City Brewing Co. by MUTI

 

Big City Brewing Co. by MUTI

Big City Brewing Co. by MUTI

 

Big City Brewing Co. by MUTI

Big City Brewing Co. by MUTI

 

Kikusui Story Tape by Lily Kao

Kikusui Story Tape by Lily Kao

 

Kikusui Story Tape by Lily Kao

Kikusui Story Tape by Lily Kao

 

Typography Snacks by Snack Studio

Typography Snacks by Snack Studio

Weekly Inspiration #1

Cheers to incredible designers and artists everywhere! This post is a part of a weekly series to honor these artists and inspire other designers by sharing their work. If you’d like to share your graphic design inspiration, you can submit your images and inspiration via Twitter @longlegsandhair.

Vintage & Eroded Font by Aleph Corp

Vintage & Eroded Font by Aleph Corp

the-swap-show-ticket-design-2

The Swap Show by Foreign Policy

the-swap-shop-ticket-design-1

Rising Canes by Chris Pecht

Rising Canes by Chris Pecht

Cat Museum by Carrie Liao

Cat Museum by Carrie Liao

AIM Studios' Brainstorms & Cigarettes

AIM Studios’ Brainstorms & Cigarettes

Art I Heart by Felipe Achondo

Art I Heart by Felipe Achondo

Font of the Week: Ludo Sans

Type, type, hurray! For all you typography nerds out there, I’m excited to bring you a special typeface this week (I promise, your eyes will fan girl squeal). Today’s font of choice is Ludo Sans, an experimental typeface created by director David Luepschen and art director/graphic design Janina Sitzmann. This handcrafted sans serif font is made using a Strata-Cut technique—or in layman’s terms a type of clay animation. This style of animation was invented in the 20s by a German animator named Oskar Fischinger and refined in the 80s by David Daniels.

The typeface was created out of strands of plasticine and molded into a loaf that was then thinly sliced. Slice by slice the camera captured the transformation of the type’s organic evolution.

Ludo Sans Font Typeface Animation Ludo Sans Clay Preparation Ludo Sans Font Formation in Clay Ludo Sans Clay Font Formation Ludo Sans Typeface Gif of Ludo Sans Typeface Timeframe Ludo Sans FontLudo Sans Font

Designed to Float: Houseboats Capture the Imagination of Architecture Design

There’s something about water that pulls on human consciousness, maybe it’s the serenity that comes from the vast expanse of deep blue or the unpredictability of the water’s movements? Whatever it is, it continues to inspire unconventional design. You can find it walking the lovers’ lazy promenade along the Seine and passing through the winding Spree River of Berlin. Moored on the cusp of these bobbing rivers sits rows of houseboats. The idea of living on a river charms the imagination to dream of a life of autonomy. The appeal often comes from the mystery of who inhabits these homes, but the design is the true clue to the unknown.

Modern Houseboat by +31 Architecture in Amsterdam

Modern Houseboat by +31 Architecture in Amsterdam

The Amsterdam-based studio, +31 Architects, is one notable firm plopping eye-catching houseboats into Netherland’s canals. Located on the waterways of the Amstel river sits the sleek Watervilla Weesperzijde. The design was inspired by the water itself. The studio explained, “in our design we try to maximize the view to the water and if possible make the living areas as close to the water as possible so you are able to feel and even touch it.” When designing this project, the firm did not want to lose the typical characteristics of a houseboat, so they were particular with their contemporary design.

plus-31-architects-watervilla-weesperzijde-amsterdam-netherlands-designboom-08

300 miles away in the twinkling city of Paris, another architect was inspired to give her old floating home a modern makeover. Valérie Mazerat and her daughter reside on a 100-year-old barge named Margot. Margot’s previous owner fitted her with a 1920s train carriage that still remains after the redesign. Anchored in central Paris, not far from the infamous Bastille, this beautiful floating home is truly breathtaking on the inside. Picture Danish wooden furniture from the 1950s interwoven with industrial metals and smooth leather that give the space a comfortable contemporary feel.

Valérie Mazerat on her houseboat in Paris

Valérie Mazerat on her houseboat in Paris

 

Interior-Parisian-Houseboat-Barge-Margot

Inside-Paris-House-Boat-Bastille

Valerie-Mazerat-houseboat-Seine-Paris-River

Exterior-Deck-Of-Houseboat-On-Seine

The next 645-square foot houseboat was dreamed-up by the brother design duo, Chris and Oliver Laugsch. Situated on Lake Rummelsburg, the large glass walls that encompass this boat provide sweeping views of the city and a tranquil seat to enjoy residential wildlife.

Berlin Lake Rummelsburg Houseboat

View from Lake Rummelsburg Houseboat

Contemporary Clean Interior Design

Interior of Berlin Houseboat

Houseboat on Spree River in Berlin

Houseboats provide an escape from the anchored life of cramped apartment buildings and the horror of shopping mall suburbia. They give you the option to live like a nomad and explore the slow curves of fluid waterways. Designing for something with such a free spirit is a difficult undertaking, but as you can see, these architects and designers did not falter at the water, but plunged into its cold embrace to create something unforgettable.

Avoid Being Costumeless on Halloween: Printable Halloween Masks

Happy Halloweekend, you lovely spookies. Remember the eager anticipation you felt as a child when the calendar hit 10/1? You had your costume PLANNED. You knew what you were going to be like it was a test you’d been prepping for all year. Years go by and now, if you’re anything like me, your costume doesn’t come to fruition on October 1st, but somewhere closer to the 24-hour frantic rush before Halloween. Fortunately, I’ve got your back and this year I’ve compiled some printable masks you can throw on for free (no tricks attached)!

Click here to download this owl face:

Printable Halloween Owl Mask Colorful Printable Halloween Owl Mask

Click here to download a 3D cartoon man:

Strongman Mask for a 3D Printable Halloween Mask

Click here for a ferret mask:

Ferret Printable Halloween mask

Click here and here to pick from one of the Adventure Time characters:

Adventure Time Cartoon Network Printable Halloween Masks Finn and Jake

Click here to download an illustrated mask by Hunter Schafer:

Printable Halloween Mask Candle Face by Hunter Schafer Small Printable Halloween Masks by Hunter Schafer

Now instead of being judged for wearing the same skeleton t-shirt you bought 3 years ago, you’ll have a unique costume to tromps in throughout the night. Tweet me your Halloween masks @LongLegsandHair and stay spooky my friends.